Adult Sunday School

Ask of Me and I Will Give You the Nations

(An augmented transcript from the Adult Sunday School class, 10/23/2016)


Psalm 2

(1) Why do the nations make trouble and the countries plot in vain? (2) The kings of the earth take their stand, and potentates collude together against Yahweh and against his Messiah. (3) Let us tear off their bonds, and let us throw their ropes from ourselves. (4) He who sits enthroned in the heavens laughs, the Lord ridicules them. (5) Then he speaks to them in his anger, and in his wrath he terrifies them. (6) “I am the one who has anointed my king upon Zion, my holy mountain.” (7) I will recount the decree of Yahweh. He said to me, “You are my son. Today I have become your father. (8) Ask of me and I will give the nations as your inheritance, and as your possession the ends of the earth. (9) You will break them with a rod of iron, like the vessels of a potter you will shatter them.” (10) So now, you kings, be wise, and allow yourselves to be chastened, you rulers of the earth. (11) Serve Yahweh in fear, tremble in terror. (12) Pay pure homage, lest he become angry and you perish in your ways, for his anger is kindled quickly. Blessed are all who seek refuge in him.

An Idealized Portrait of Israel’s King

Psalm 2 proclaims that the LORD rules the heavens and the earth, and those who deny this or struggle against it do so in vain. The nations of the world would be wise to acknowledge the rulership of God’s chosen one. Those who do not do so are cruisin’ for a bruisin’. But what does it mean to struggle against God’s rulership? What does it mean to throw off his bonds and cords? What does it mean for the Messiah to receive the nations as his inheritance? Who is the Messiah in this psalm? These are questions we have to think about if this psalm is to have a contemporary relevance. And I think Psalm 2 does have profound relevance for us, perhaps more for us today even than for the psalm’s original audience, whoever and whenever that might have been. (more…)

By Kerry Lee, ago